Facial gua sha is a technique used by the ancient Chinese to keep their facial skin looking youthful and healthy. Sometimes referred to as an ‘Eastern Facelift’ facial gua sha may improve the health of your skin while creating lift and a glowing complexion. This is achieved by using gentle gua sha techniques to the face to encourage circulation and lymphatic drainage.

In this exclusive workshop you will learn a simple gua sha protocol to include in your beauty regime. You will also be introduced to some acupressure and facial yoga exercises.We will begin the session with an introduction to traditional Chinese Medicine (tCM) facial diagnosis or face reading. You will examine your own face and learn to interpret your wrinkles discovering what they reveal about your health and your emotions. You will then be introduced to your jade gua sha tool and the practical aspects of this workshop.

In this workshop you will receive:

• Facial Gua Sha instructions

• Weleda travel size soothing facial almond oil
• Jade Gua Sha tool
• Gua Sha travel wallet

For information or to book your space contact Ruth, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Space limited
Date: Sunday October 28th

Time: 13:00 – 15:00
Cost: contact Ruth

Puffy, itchy watery eyes? Cough, sneezing, runny nose, wiped out? Hayfever.

I yearn for summer until that is that I remember that over the past few years I have developed hayfever. Yesterday I went for a long, windy bike ride and woke up with puffy eyes…it can take a few hours of cooling eye masks, facial yoga and acupuncture for them to get back to normal.


What is hay fever?
Hay fever is a common allergic condition caused by pollen. It’s the proteins in pollen that cause irritation to the nose, eyes, throat and sinuses. As I was out on my bike, it was the wind-borne pollen causing my problems (hay fever is only caused by wind-pollinated plants, like grasses, trees and weeds).

Why am I getting it now when I’ve never had it before?
It’s only for the past couple of years that I’ve experienced hayfever. As an acupuncturist I view my body holistically and self-diagnose and treat.

Very briefly and hugely over-simplified:  I have a history of eczema and family history of asthma and hayfever. I have constitutionally weak Lung qi (energy) and as I get older (now in my 40’s) my Kidney Qi weakens also…this leads to a vulnerability to external allergens, such as pollen. My body’s defences aren’t as strong as they used to be and the pollen knocks my immune system off kilter.

Here’s how I manage my symptoms…

Is there any way to avoid hay fever?
It’s hard to avoid pollen, but I try to keep windows in buildings and cars shut when there’s a high pollen count, and avoid walking in grassy areas during the afternoon and early evening, when symptoms can be worse. As pollen gets trapped in hair, I wash mine regularly – I forgot to wash it after my bike ride.

Natural Help – my Top 5
Obviously, I try to manage my hayfever naturally if I can (admittedly, this is not always enough!)

1. try homeopathic anti-histamines

2. drink nettle tea or summer flowers tea (a blend of chamomile flowers, nettle leaf & eyebright herb) – I get mine from Napiers, organic, loose

3. eat local honey

4. reduce consumption of dairy - avoid milk, cheese, chocolate. Reduce sugar, salt, caffeine (see ‘500 of the most important health tips you’ll ever need,’ Hazel Courteney for a longer list)

5. try traditional Acupuncture to reduce symptoms and prepare your defences for 2018 by booking a course of acupuncture to address constitutional imbalances.

As the British Acupuncture Council states in it’s response to the questions: Can Acupuncture help hay fever?

“The received wisdom inside the modern profession is that it is better to commence treatment before the time that the condition, if it is seasonal, would normally present, and our clinical experience has been that once the condition has kicked in, a reduction in the severity of the symptoms is the best that one can hope for. If the condition is always present, it can sometimes be a long haul to bring the system back to a point where the symptoms are minor and bearable.” Read whole article here.

For more information or if you have questions give me a call or e-mail:

077 88 616 488
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Spring is here! A time of surging energy and new growth. The Yin of Winter is transforming into Yang (not yet the full Yang of Summer), and the evidence is all around us in nature. We too experience this seasonal shift in energy, which can be more challenging for some. It’s a perfect time for an acupuncture treatment tune-up – and many of my regular patients return at Spring-time for some traditional Chinese acupuncture as energetic support during this time of changing qi.

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In my last Blog I explained a little about 5 Element theory as being rooted in nature’s seasons (The 5 Elements & Your Health – Earth) and how it allows us to classify people into element types. As microcosms of nature we have within in us all 5 Elements, but as with nature our inner climate has a hierarchy of elements. Identifying this interplay is what allows your acupuncturist to diagnose and treat you. It also gives you tools to better understand and maintain your own health and those of your friends and family.

Spring is associated with the Wood Element and the organ pair, Liver (LIV) and Gall Bladder (GB). If Wood is your dominant element then you may manifest some characteristic symptoms when out of balance.

Read on to find out how to identify Wood as a dominant element (s) in either yourself and/or others and discover some self-help tools to stay healthy this Spring.

Read more ...

Today is the start of the year of the Earth Dog, but there are actually five different types of Dogs based on the five elements of Wood. Fire, Earth, Metal and Water. You’ve most probably heard of these elements, but how do they influence you and your health?

Rooted in nature’s seasons, 5 Element theory allows us to classify people into element types. As microcosms of nature we have within in us all 5 Elements, but as with nature our inner climate has a hierarchy of elements. Identifying this interplay is what allows your acupuncturist to diagnose and treat you. It also gives you tools to better understand and maintain your own health and those of your friends and family.



In Chinese Medicine, 5 Element theory underpins your acupuncture treatment. As soon as a new patient enters my treatment room I mentally gather information. How do they move? What body shape are they? What tone is their voice? So the list goes on as you provide data that I can use to better understand your element or constitution type.

Each element has a host of associations, but for our purposes, they relate to an organ pair. For example, The Spleen (SP) and Stomach (ST) belong to the Earth element. If Earth is your dominant element then you may manifest some characteristic symptoms when out of balance. But don't worry (an Earth type tendency!) there are things you can do for yourself to regain your equilibrium...

Read on to find out how you can identify your dominant element (s) and discover some self-help tools including dietary advice, acupressure and yoga...

Read more ...

Earlier I was sitting in my office doing admin listening to a discussion on Radio 4 about the menopause. My post arrived and in it was a book I had recently ordered: Managing Menopause Naturally with Chinese Medicine, by Honora Lee Wolfe.

Why the growing interest in the menopause? Personally, the menopause is more on my mind as I approach my mid-40's, my middle age, as, although my periods may not stop until I'm 50, physiologically I'm already changing, I'm peri-menopausal.


Consequently, I'm taking stock and reviewing my life-style choices.  Preserving my energy reserves (Jing) for later in my life is more of a priority.  For example, I’m balancing my tendency towards Yang activity like mountain biking with more Yin activity – contemplation in woods and Yin yoga. Likewise, I’m making more informed dietary choices such as substituting Yin depleting coffee for Blood nourishing drinks, such as hibiscus and nettle teas.



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Acupuncture practitioners in the UK (article written by the BAcC can viewed on their website here)

Two main groups of health professionals employ acupuncture techniques in their clinical work. The main group are professional traditional acupuncturists who have normally completed a 3,600 hour, degree level training in line with the recommendations of the World Health Organisation.

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